Farmers In The Hangman Creek Watershed Area In Eastern Washington Are Being Advised To Take Up No-till Farming To Reduce Pollution Concerns

Posted Feb 24, 2011 in Blog & Industry News

CURRENT PRICE

FEATURED NEWS

Deerland Equipment takes on SMART Seeder™ MAX Distribution...
Read More

Subscribe

Subscribe below to get the latest
industry and Clean Seed Capital news.


Sign Up

CURRENT PRICE

FEATURED NEWS

Deerland Equipment takes on SMART Seeder™ MAX Distribution...

Subscribe

Get the latest industry
and Clean Seed Capital news.

Plan involves reducing pollution, improving habitat

By MATTHEW WEAVER
Capital Press

Farmers in the Hangman Creek watershed area in Eastern Washington are being advised to take up no-till farming to reduce pollution concerns.

The Washington State Department of Ecology has released its plan to reduce pollution in the watershed to the public for comment.

According to the department, the plan is based on a September 2010 water quality improvement report for the watershed. Also known as the Latah Creek watershed, the area drains roughly 431,000 acres in Spokane and Whitman counties.

The department’s plan intends to reduce fecal coliform bacteria and muddy water and includes measures to decrease the temperature of the water, which is often too warm to support fish and other aquatic life.

According to the department, concerns in the watershed area include phosphorus pollution in the Spokane River, which encourages the growth of algae that use up the oxygen fish need to survive.

Agricultural runoff and livestock and forestry practices are also concerns, according to the department.

The plan calls for native plants to provide shade to the streams to lower the temperature, and intends to reintroduce beavers to the watershed to reduce pollution.

The plan recommends that farmers adopt direct-seed tillage, a seeding practice that minimizes soil disturbance and decreases erosion and runoff.

The plan also calls for installing streamwide fencing with off-stream watering facilities in livestock areas. That would ensure the stream corridor is protected from livestock and wildlife that would deposit fecal matter, trample vegetation or break up soil.

Ecology Communications Manager Jani Gilbert said the watershed includes 275,000 acres of farmland.

Farmers were notified about the best management practices in the plan, Gilbert said.

“We don’t enforce on these if someone opts not to use direct seed, for example,” she said. “We do enforce if the Clean Water Act is violated.”

The act says that pollutants are never allowed to be discharged into waters of the state, Gilbert said.

“By adopting these best management practices, a landowner can rest easy that they won’t violate the Clean Water Act,” she said.

 

STAY UP TO DATE WITHTHE LATEST NEWS


Deerland Equipment takes on SMART Seeder™ MAX Distribution

Sep 15, 2021

Clean Seed Featured in AMC’s Implement Success Magazine - The Game Changers - Driving Innovation in Ag

Sep 13, 2021 - AMC Success

Clean Seed on Target for Growth – Momentum Update – Summer 2021

Aug 11, 2021

Clean Seed Appoints Advisors

Jul 30, 2021

Clean Seed to Launch SMART Seeder MAX in USA and Files Application to Trade on OTCQB Venture Market

Jun 8, 2021

Clean Seed SMART Seeder MAX™ Sales Program Opens Strong

Jun 2, 2021

Clean Seed to Break Ground on New Operations and Assembly Facility in Saskatchewan

Mar 24, 2021

Clean Seed Opens Global Distribution Recruitment on the SMART Seeder MAX/MAX-S for Dealers and Agronomy Partners

Mar 4, 2021

Ahead of the Curve

Mar 2, 2021 - Farming for Tomorrow

Clean Seed adds Key Commercialization Vice President Positions to Support Rapid Growth Cycle

Feb 24, 2021

Clean Seed Capital Group beefs up management team hiring industry veteran to fuel growth

Feb 24, 2021 - Proactive

Steve Sommerfeld Joins Clean Seed Capital’s Board of Directors

Feb 10, 2021